Monday , August 15 2022

The mysterious source of radioactive heat in Antarctica melts slowly



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<p class = "canvas-atom canvas-text Mb (1.0m) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8cm) under the Antarctic ice, there is a source of radioactive heat that slowly slows the ice from the bottom, I think the researchers. "data-reactid =" 22 "> Miles under the Antarctic ice, there is a source of radioactive heat that slowly binds the ice below, the researchers think.

<p class = "canvas-atom canvas-text Mb (1.0em) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8m) – sm" type = "text" content = two miles under ice, where the hot material seems to be (very slowly) melted by ice. "Researchers flew by radar to" see "two miles under ice, where the hot material seems to be (very slowly) the melting of the ice.

Researchers believe that the heat source is radioactive rocks and hot water inside the crust of the Earth.

While Antarctica will not melt overnight, it could have important effects in tackling climate change, according to new measurements by the British Antarctic Survey (BAS).

Scientists are studying hot rocks to see how they will affect future ice changes.

Researcher Tom Jordan said: "The meltdown we've seen has probably gone from thousands or even millions of years, and does not directly contribute to changing the ice sheet.

"However, in the future, extra water from the ice sheet can make this region more sensitive to external factors such as climate change."

<p class = "canvas-atom canvas-text Mb (1.0em) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8e)MORE: "The best financial broker in London" was closed after the glass bank rival faced with a beating
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"This was a very exciting project, exploring one of the last completely unseen regions on our planet.

"Our results were quite unexpected because many people believed that this Antarctic region was made of old and cold rocks, which had a small impact on the ice sheet above.

"We show that even within the continental continent, underlying geology can have a significant impact on ice.

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