Monday , August 15 2022

The restaurant review: Pineau's sommelier and service are beyond reproach



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Sommelier's William Saulnier's list is reasonably priced and heavy on imported organic, organic, bio-dynamic and natural wines.

Sommelier's William Saulnier's list is reasonably priced and heavy on imported organic, organic, bio-dynamic and natural wines.

Allen McInnis / Montreal Gazette

Pineau

★★ 1/2 of ★★★★

$$$

Address: 5064 Papineau Ave. (near Laurier Ave)

Phone: 514-543-5363

Open: 5 pm until 10:00. Tues.-Sat.

Website: pineau.ca

Wheelchair access: Yes

booking: Recommended

Credit cards: Major cards

Friendly Vegetarian: Yes

Parking: Street with counters

Price Range: Beginners $ 6- $ 20; main courses $ 18- $ 32; $ 10 desserts. Five-course tasting menu, $ 65, extra wine pairs: $ 45.

Pineau's pearl, Sarak Tiann, created a menu where local and seasonal ingredients are served through artistic presentations.

The baby, Sarak Tiann, has created a menu where local and seasonal ingredients are served through artistic presentations.

Allen McInnis /

Montreal Gazette

When a new restaurant opens, my first question is always: "Who is the cook?" Some diners focus on the location, others on the decor and others on the style of the kitchen. But for me it does not matter even as much as who puts the food on my plate. However, when news from the restaurant this week hit first, the familiar name on the list of players was not the chef, but the sommelier, William Saulnier. I remember the love of the time he served me, first at the Les 400 Coups and then at Hoogan & Beaufort when he opened in 2016. Not only was he cold, calm and collected, but he also sold great wines to go with Hoogan's wonderful food. Everything was so great that I was glad to hear that she had re-emerged at this six-week restaurant. And with a name like Pineau, undoubtedly wine would be the center of the first row.

Pineau's address is familiar with me, because this summer hosted the Les Cons Servent casual bistro, where a major game was given. But with the exception of the bar and the many shelves behind it, the room feels completely different now with black and gray walls and low light enhanced with the occasional spotlight. As for food, it has changed a lot. Pineau's pearl, Sarak Tiann, created a menu where local and seasonal ingredients are served through artistic presentations. Unlike the usual small plate style, Tiann chose to go for a more standard menu, along with the choice of a five-course tasting for a reasonable price of $ 65. Although it is not a wine bar, it can certainly go to Pineau for a quick bite and a taste of one or more glass wines. Those who handle a complete bottle are well served because the Saulnier list is at reasonable and heavy prices on imported, organic, bio-dynamic and natural wines.

The menu starts with a selection of snacks ranging from olives to oysters. I opted for a sort of nouveau shrimp cocktail, where shrimps are served with green salsa, and a plate containing smoked duck slices, crowned croton, ricot and ginger salt and yuzu syrup. I liked both dishes and I highly recommend starting with one of them, especially with one of four local tap drinks (IPA Américaine from Isle de Garde is one of the best beers you have ever had) I enjoyed the elderly) or possibly a cocktail. The "creamy palm" made of tequila, grapefruit juice and a flavored corn syrup sugar syrup had an impressive balance and a deep aroma. Deadly, mind, but delicious.

A hot steak band and grilled steak with a handful of artichoke chips in Jerusalem and a cold, emulsifying cream made with shrimp and marrow at Pineau in Montreal.

A hot steak band and grilled steak with a handful of artichoke chips in Jerusalem and a cold, emulsifying cream made with shrimp and marrow at Pineau in Montreal.

Allen McInnis /

Montreal Gazette

On aperitifs, from which we chose the carrots fried with cumin and the skein roast with the marrow. Carrot food consisted of a carrot purée and a caraway with fried carrots and a sesame sliced ​​on the edge of the plate. Strangely enough, what has failed here has been carrots, who have been overwhelmed and bored, tasting more of their honey glaze than the sweetness we associate with carrots. The powder was also a wish because the chimney stole the show again. Nothing but to say anything other than I think they need a new carrot supplier.

The second starter presented a hot roast strip of steak and roast steak with a particularly wild taste. Besides, there was a handful of artichoke chips from Jerusalem and a cold, emulsified cream made with rats and a marrow that was good (very marrow), but it could have been better served.

For the main courses I went for a fish (halibut) and a meat (duck). Though perfectly prepared, the halibut had a so dense texture that everyone at the table continued to say, "Wow, that's a sturdy halibut." I expect the halibut to be firm, but more delicate than firm. However, the thick meat aside, the fish were excellent and well-enriched with blue cauliflower flowers, king mushrooms, a sucker sauce and a single leek on the barbecue on top. As for the duck or, more specifically, an effilloché of duck legs, the wet meat was loaded under a thick piece of toasted muffin together with Shiitake mushrooms and parsnip, mashed chips and duck skin , textures. I liked everything on the plate, except for the bread, which did not serve any real purpose. Should I take the river over … to eat it between the bites … to get it with the wine? I'm not sure.

Pineau choux praline dessert has a pronounced flavor of caramelized hazelnuts and a serious crisis.

Pineau choux praline dessert has a pronounced flavor of caramelized hazelnuts and a serious crisis.

Allen McInnis /

Montreal Gazette

Of the three desserts I offered, I chose the pressed apple stacks and the praline buns. The apple stack was a flop, unfortunately because the tonka bean crème anglaise served along it was too strong (when used with a too heavy hand, the tonka taste is like soap), and the apples were numb and hard caramelized . I turned my attention to the wonderful cookie-shaped cookie with him, which was beautiful, but the only important point on this $ 10 plate. Choux, however, was great. The paste was light and crisp, and the home-made praline filler had a pronounced flavor of caramelized hazelnuts and a serious crisis. Perfect.

Not all were perfect at Pineau, but the drink of the equation was certainly beyond reproach, as was the service. Over the course of the evening, Saulnier poured out some real winners, including an Italian Italian wine, a southern French chenan / terret mix, a Montepulciano and a Bourgogne alligator, all of which are interesting and suitable for our food. Eventually, that breakthrough element is the main draw at this promising little restaurant or, as my fellow dining companion told me after the first sip and first bite: "What fun to be tonight on a quiet day , sharing new things. " I can not agree more.

You can listen to Lesley Chesterman on the ICI Radio-Canada Première Grand Medium (95.1 FM), Tuesday at 10:00, and at CHOM (97.7 FM) Wednesday at 7:10 am.

Dining Room in Pineau in Montreal.

Allen McInnis /

Montreal Gazette

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